May 22, 2009

In Memory of Sam Maloof


Celebrated woodworker Sam Maloof died Thursday night. His modern rocking chairs and other furniture adorn private collections and museums around the world. In 1996, I first photographed him in his old house that was later moved to make room for the 210 Freeway extension. I cherished every moment I photographed him, admiring a true artist. To see more photos, Click here. As you can see above, I have used Sam in my blog title for the past year. (Photos while working at the Daily Bulletin)
Click here to see even more photos of a gallery of images I shot on www.dailybulletin.com from January 2008.

May 17, 2009

Jeff Malet Photography Website

http://www.jeffmalet.com

May 2, 2009

How many times can I go up and down


One, two, three, four, five, six and if I’m lucky all the way to 10. Up and down, up or down. The fascination with the elevator is as strong as ever as I get older.

Maybe I don’t have the desire to punch all of the buttons, go to the top, and back down, and doing that over and over. At least that is what I did when I was a kid.

Macy’s, Robinsons, Bullocks, the dentist office, and any hotel or tall building I might be in are all places I played with the elevator. I almost always hung out in one because I was bored waiting. I always waited for my mom to finish shopping, my sister to finish getting her teeth cleaned, or just I just needed to get out of the hotel room.

I came across an elevator being repaired the other day. This elevator goes back around 30 years. Looks like they have replaced certain parts I can’t name, but it was shiny and new which made me stop. I like they way there is sheen, a reflective feeling to it. The light inside the shaft gives off an orange-red glow, which adds a layer to the overall simple photo.


In the other photo to the right, I was again intrigued with the machine part of the elevator. After trying several filters through Adobe Photoshop, I settled on Find Edges, which can be found under Filter and then under Stylize. This really brought out the mechanics and subtle shades and lines that are not so visible just looking at it. Plus, it also made it artsy in a drawing old-school way.